devn-ppc8260-ads.so

bridged with qdn.cafe
Post Reply
server

devn-ppc8260-ads.so

Post by server » Fri Aug 02, 2002 5:59 pm

message unavailable

Peter Bone

RE: devn-ppc8260-ads.so

Post by Peter Bone » Fri Aug 02, 2002 5:59 pm

I have recently migrated to QNX 6.2 from 6.1 and have found that all
attempts to start io-net with the devn-ppc8260-ads driver are failing as
follows:

e.g.

# io-net -dppc8260-ads channel=2 -ptcpip &

the response is...

# unable to init dll devn-ppc8260-ads: Invalid argument

This worked OK in my 6.1 environment as an immediate answer to the problem
could someone be kind enough to post a copy of the 6.1 binary:

/ppcbe/lib/dll/devn-ppc8260-ads.so

This would get me out of a jam for now!!

I notified the local support in my country but they have all left for the
day now...

Thanks,

Pete...

UK

Guest

Re: qdn.* web interface + searches

Post by Guest » Mon Dec 16, 2002 4:58 am

webmaster@openqnx.com sed in <ath86i$ggq$2@tiger.openqnx.com>:
After browsing a bit, tha available newsgroups looks similar
to those available in Google
(i.e groups which is "leaking out" outside {inn,nntp}.qnx.com)

Are you using feeds from "public" servers, or direct with inn.qnx.com?

For example, is qdn.public.qnxrtp.x86 visible there?

If you're using "leaky" feeds, the posts won't go into inn.qnx.com
as leaks are unidirectional.
--
kabe

Guest

Re: qdn.* web interface + searches

Post by Guest » Mon Dec 16, 2002 6:38 am

kabe@sra-tohoku.co.jp wrote:
webmaster@openqnx.com sed in <ath86i$ggq$2@tiger.openqnx.com>:

The URL is http://www.openqnx.com/jive/

After browsing a bit, tha available newsgroups looks similar
to those available in Google
(i.e groups which is "leaking out" outside {inn,nntp}.qnx.com)

Are you using feeds from "public" servers, or direct with inn.qnx.com?

For example, is qdn.public.qnxrtp.x86 visible there?

If you're using "leaky" feeds, the posts won't go into inn.qnx.com
as leaks are unidirectional.
We have no relations to google. eg: google doesn't have qdn.cafe but
we do. the last post in qdn.public.qnx4 on google was Dec 12 but
ours is Dec 16, etc.

As for unidirectional or bidirectional, it should be easy to test it
out :) Due to caching settings, your post via the web interface may
take up to 30 minutes to show up in inn.qnx.com

To begin with, we only setup those most popular groups, and that's why
you don't see qdn.public.qnxrtp.x86 in there. As stated in my first
post, we welcome suggestions and are planning to add more groups
as requested by users.

Since google's archive is an unhealthy leakage as you find out,
it could go away anytime once they figure it out :) Relying on
them is probably a bad idea.

Guest

Re: qdn.* web interface + searches

Post by Guest » Mon Dec 30, 2002 11:54 pm

kabe@sra-tohoku.co.jp wrote:
For example, is qdn.public.qnxrtp.x86 visible there?
qdn.public.qnxrtp.x86 is added per your suggestion.
Please let us know if you want to add other groups that aren't
usually being used.

Bill Caroselli

Re: TCPA/Palladium

Post by Bill Caroselli » Thu Mar 06, 2003 8:28 pm

(Old thread dragged over from Advocacy group)

Rennie Allen <rallen@csical.com> wrote:
I just read about this initiative on slashdot. I have never been
concerned about any of the so called "big brother" scenerios in the
past, but this thing really freaks me out.

Not being one to put a lot of credence in things I read on /., I was
wondering if anyone here has any information to ease my fears ?

Is this really as bad as it appears ? Is anyone here up on this thing ?

Rennie
Is anyone up on the latest of what is going on here?

All I was able to find was this article on the name change.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/4/29039.html
to Next Generation Secure Computing Base (NGSCB).

#/** PhEDIT attribute block
#-11:16777215
#0:739:default:-3:-3:0
#739:767:TextFont09:0:-1:0
#767:792:default:-3:-3:0
#792:820:TextFont09:0:-1:0
#820:839:default:-3:-3:0
#** PhEDIT attribute block ends (-0000216)**/

Guest

Crosssite Scripting (Re: loadifs: Multiboot loader ...)

Post by Guest » Tue Mar 18, 2003 5:21 am

** Cc: qdn.cafe in case nospam@ is devnulled

nospam@forums.openqnx.com sed in <17156065.1047933718524.JavaMail.fliu@tiger>:
Sorry. It was my mistake. I tried to read the message via http://www.openqnx.com/jive/index.jsp. Apparently the interface has a message size limitation. Finally I read the entire message on http://www.openqnx.com.
I noticed that the gatewayed article doesn't escape
"<" ">" in <PRE> region
which could lead to "cross site scripting"
(i.e post something <SCRIPT>send_creditcard_no()</SCRIPT> in qdn.*)

--
kabe

Kevin Stallard

Re: Problems with nested interrupts at high interrupt load ?

Post by Kevin Stallard » Sat Aug 23, 2003 1:56 am

"Miguel Simon" <simon@ou.edu> wrote in message
news:3F46B5C0.2070508@ou.edu...
Hi Kevin...

I hope that all is well.

I would not waste my time too much. Just forget this and let it go as I
had to do some time ago. It is not worth any of your time. It may be
that a lot of this has nothing to do with technical issues, you know...
At the end, the fundamental issues may not even be a personal thing,
but something wholly related to nationalism and political standing, who
knows. Go figure...
Hey Miguel!,

Oh, it isn't anything personal...I'm just trying to get along with Armin...
he's a talented guy, just hard to communciation wtih and was taking an
opportunity to see if things couldn't be improved.

But yeah...I'm won't be awake at night wondering if he likes me or not.

But hey...CA is on our way! I'm looking forward to blowing up some $5000
inverters! It should be fun!

Do you think we'll get to see AAAArrrrrnnold? ;)

Later bro,

Kevin
Any way, I hope to see you in a few weeks in CA.

Regards...

Miguel.



Kevin Stallard wrote:
Rennie, the answer on my question was really annoying:
"Not that we will find anything wrong with your code, but it may
help if you could you post the snippet of code that handles
interrupts in your resmgrs."

As you like to interpret, just my interpretation to that answer:
1. he was not able to read and understand the question
2. examination of a snipped code can't tell you if others saw the
same problem
3. the answer implies that I didn't check my code before asking, and
that I've no experience with simple handling of interrupts...






It's too bad that your first inclination is to assume I didn't
understand
the question. A lot of assumptions have been made here and it is making
communication difficult. Lets see if we can make some sense of it
before
any more bridges are destroyed.



1. You noticed I didn't answer your question directly. This is
perfectly
acceptable in the English communication. It means the answer is 'no'
but
the person responding doesn't want you to think this is a dead end. Now
when you read this, you had a number of choices before you. You could
have
concluded a number of things

a. Kevin is an idiot

b. Kevin's light bulb is too dim to understand my question (I
do
admit, sometimes it is dim...but this time it wasn't, trust me).

c. Kevin thinks I'm an idiot and that I don't know how to write
interrupt handlers, so I'm going to ignore it and respond in a curt and
arrogant way...that will teach hime to read and respect me!!!

d. Kevin is a very talented QNX software engineer who very
quickly
examined his recent and not so recent experiences and concluded that
there
was no known issue he was aware of and is seeking to engage me in a
conversation about my problem. Wow.....what a nice and considerate
fellow.



It looks like to me you choose a combination of b and c. That is
unfortunate. After a long and hard thread on QNX licenses, I was
actually
hoping to redeem a little bit of a professional relationship by
responding
to your post in what I thought was a helpful and unoffending way.



I had hoped that you would have chosen something along the lines of 'd'.
I
don't require you to assume I'm a talented QNX software engineer, but at
least I can expect that your first assumption was that I do understand,
that
the answer is 'no' and that I want to be of further assistance.



In summary for #1 the rule is: Don't assume someone doesn't understand
because they didn't explicitly answer your question. Assume the answer
is
in the negative 'i.e. No' but the writer wishes to expand on the subject
so
that he may...even if in a small way...be of assistance in helping you
find
a solution.



2. It was obvious that you didn't understand my opening statement.
Even in
English, sometimes we have to translate into English....



"Not that we will find anything wrong with your code..."



is the same as



"No, I don't know of any issues with QNX and interrupts. And I know
that
there are no errors in your code, but I would like to help and posting
it or
some other details about what you are doing would help me (and others)
understand more about the problem. We would like to offer suggestions
and
generally be as helpful as possible."



As you can see...the first is much shorter, and therefore preferable.
It
assumes the reader has sufficient understanding of the modifiers used in
the
sentence...and that the reader is also inclined to believe that the
writer
thinks the reader is competent (which I do btw..in fact I think you are
extremely competent).



Now...I have spent time with people from Germany...and they are a very
rugged, and individualistic people. This is a good thing. I understand
that offering assistance to a German citizen who is very able to take
care
of the problem himself *can* be considered and insult and you will more
than
likely get the cold shoulder. I have been the recipient of a German
Cold
Shoulder on a number of occasions. This is a cultural difference and
there
is nothing wrong with it. I'm not offended.



However, it is required here that you at least be polite about refusing
help. If you don't wish to be polite, don't say anything. Being easily
offened is not very charateritic of strength.



Keep in mind your native tongue is German and mine is English. There
will
be differences, patience is key.



Regards,



Kevin




Jutta Steinhoff

Re: Problems with nested interrupts at high interrupt load ?

Post by Jutta Steinhoff » Mon Aug 25, 2003 12:28 pm

Kevin Stallard wrote:
[Armin] Rennie, the answer on my question was really annoying:
"Not that we will find anything wrong with your code, but it
may help if you could you post the snippet of code that
handles interrupts in your resmgrs."

As you like to interpret, just my interpretation to that answer:
1. he was not able to read and understand the question
2. examination of a snipped code can't tell you if others saw the
same problem
3. the answer implies that I didn't check my code before asking, and
that I've no experience with simple handling of interrupts...


[Kevin] It's too bad that your first inclination is to assume I
didn't understand the question. A lot of assumptions have been
made here and it is making communication difficult.
Kevin, please have in mind that there are some national differences when
you have an international NG. Also, the use of NGs is with different
intention, also it's depending if you have time or not.
So, one reports a problem and asks just for a short answer/information.
Another one likes to discuss issues extended in the NGs and others like
small talk in the NGs, etc.

If something could be a severe hardware or QNX related problem like in
the case when Armin asked if a problem is known, so it makes sense to
discuss such a problem directly with QSSL. E.g. a public discussion
about the interrupt problem with the MGT5100 hadn't helped QSSL to fix
the problem some monthes earlier...

[Kevin]
1. You noticed I didn't answer your question directly. This is
perfectly acceptable in the English communication. It means
the answer is 'no' but the person responding doesn't want
you to think this is a dead end. Now when you read this,
you had a number of choices before you. You could have
concluded a number of things...
.... but it will be a surprise for you that no one of your flowerful
conclusions hit the nail ;-) The very simple conclusion was: "why
doesn't he shut his mouth when he didn't saw a similar problem"; it's
nothing personal and has nothing to do with competence etc.

You have to accept that non Americans can react other than you expect
and what is meant helpful from you can be annoying for another one. Then
the answer sounds rude for you while it sound normal for others...

Answers in technical NGs should be related to the topic and as you
wrote, you have learned already national differences....

BTW, it would be interesting to compare a table with sold QNX
developer's seats (w/o Priority Support Plan)/country vs. a table with
percentage of QDN postings/country. And then you can try to find out
why both tables are not proportional ... it's not only the language
or bad internet connection in some countries!


You wrote:
"You noticed I didn't answer your question directly. This is
perfectly acceptable in the English communication."

You are right, but it's often not acceptable in non English
communication!
Have a look to the English language: it's impossible to say only "no" or
"yes". You have to say 'yes' or 'no', additional with some blah blah or
repeating something like a parrot.

That's a difference to other languages and the way of thinking...

Can you imagine that e.g. Western European exchange students who go to
England or America have to learn at first how important are meaningless
polite phrases and that they have to tell "please", "may I help you?"
etc. as often as possible? Also, they have to learn that "how are you?"
is meaningless and nobody expects a real answer on it.
The most difficult issue for exchange students is that they have to keep
smiling and to wrap their meaning in many polite and positive words.
"Open" discussions, are to avoid... that's a big cultural difference.


e.g. "open" discussions with customers and pot. customers:
when there is an European request for something which makes no sense,
it's no problem to tell for what reason we don't sell it or would do the
requested custom engineering. It's no problem to discuss pros and cons
of better solutions.

If it's a NA customer, so I was taught that you have to make a "don't
want" price and you will get a problem if the customer even accepts that
price...

When you ask me, I prefer the 'unpolite' European way of bussiness and
our customers are happy to get solutions according the state of the art
;-)


Years ago, an American chairman of an international organization
explained me the difference of American and European business in the
following way:
You can order someting in America and you will get something very
fast, but you don't know if it meets your requirements. When you
order something in Europe, they tell you a delivery time of a few
days or more, but you can rely on it and you will get exactly what
you ordered.

It was amazing for me and hard to believe... but meanwhile we have
many years experience with NA soap bubbles in datas of products or
on homepages...
BTW, in the past I didn't understand why pot. customers from NA asked
if our offered products are _really_available_, it was a completely
absurd question for me...


you wrote:
"It means the answer is 'no' but the person responding doesn't
want you to think this is a dead end."

Believe me, that's the most annoying way of answer for non Americans
;-)

An other typial way of American comminication is "ignoring" something,
so it's quite normal for you when anyone says e.g. "It's hard to
ignore"... but ignoring can be seen as extremely unpolite on other
continents.

Just an example for American politeness which is annoying for me:
When returning from international fairs, we have a Carnet (customs
document) for the exhibition stuff. That document must be stamped
before leaving the country and it's always hard to find the customs
on an airport when you are departing.
Ask official persons from an US airport and the fun starts: most of
them are so polite that they never will tell you that they don't know.
So they give you a direction, assuming where it could be... and being
happy that they could 'help' you in a polite way... OK, with such great
and polite help it took us e.g. in Newark more than one hour to find
anyone competent who really knew where was the small back door to the
customs office from the departure level. (The arrival level can't be
passed in opposit direction!)

On non US airports the correct information how to reach customs office
from the departure level will take you at max.15 min., in Frankfurt
(FRA) less than 5 min.


We could go on with Asian politeness vs. Europe or NA etc., but I think
some NA/European examples will show you at least that it's always wrong
to interpret from the own standpoint as "the only right one".

In politics you will also find a lot of misunderstandings when one side
is ignoring the national way of life of the other one. Talk e.g with
guys from US and Iraque, you can talk about the same issue and what one
calls liberation is called occupation or liberation of oil from the
other one. Is only one of them right??

- Jutta

Colin Burgess

Re: Problems with nested interrupts at high interrupt load ?

Post by Colin Burgess » Mon Aug 25, 2003 1:36 pm

You and Armin seem to understand the NA mode of 'politeness' very well.
Given that, wouldn't the magnanimous thing to do be to allow for that?
I'm sure that Kevin was really only trying to be helpful.

Perhaps the key to international cooperation is to swallow annoyance
and just remember that we _are_ all different cultures, and it can
be extremely hard to remember that at times, especially when
one hasn't encountered those differences first hand.

Jutta Steinhoff <j-steinhoff@web.de> wrote:
Kevin Stallard wrote:
[Armin] Rennie, the answer on my question was really annoying:
"Not that we will find anything wrong with your code, but it
may help if you could you post the snippet of code that
handles interrupts in your resmgrs."

As you like to interpret, just my interpretation to that answer:
1. he was not able to read and understand the question
2. examination of a snipped code can't tell you if others saw the
same problem
3. the answer implies that I didn't check my code before asking, and
that I've no experience with simple handling of interrupts...


[Kevin] It's too bad that your first inclination is to assume I
didn't understand the question. A lot of assumptions have been
made here and it is making communication difficult.

Kevin, please have in mind that there are some national differences when
you have an international NG. Also, the use of NGs is with different
intention, also it's depending if you have time or not.
So, one reports a problem and asks just for a short answer/information.
Another one likes to discuss issues extended in the NGs and others like
small talk in the NGs, etc.

If something could be a severe hardware or QNX related problem like in
the case when Armin asked if a problem is known, so it makes sense to
discuss such a problem directly with QSSL. E.g. a public discussion
about the interrupt problem with the MGT5100 hadn't helped QSSL to fix
the problem some monthes earlier...
[Kevin]
1. You noticed I didn't answer your question directly. This is
perfectly acceptable in the English communication. It means
the answer is 'no' but the person responding doesn't want
you to think this is a dead end. Now when you read this,
you had a number of choices before you. You could have
concluded a number of things...

... but it will be a surprise for you that no one of your flowerful
conclusions hit the nail ;-) The very simple conclusion was: "why
doesn't he shut his mouth when he didn't saw a similar problem"; it's
nothing personal and has nothing to do with competence etc.

You have to accept that non Americans can react other than you expect
and what is meant helpful from you can be annoying for another one. Then
the answer sounds rude for you while it sound normal for others...

Answers in technical NGs should be related to the topic and as you
wrote, you have learned already national differences....

BTW, it would be interesting to compare a table with sold QNX
developer's seats (w/o Priority Support Plan)/country vs. a table with
percentage of QDN postings/country. And then you can try to find out
why both tables are not proportional ... it's not only the language
or bad internet connection in some countries!
You wrote:
"You noticed I didn't answer your question directly. This is
perfectly acceptable in the English communication."

You are right, but it's often not acceptable in non English
communication!
Have a look to the English language: it's impossible to say only "no" or
"yes". You have to say 'yes' or 'no', additional with some blah blah or
repeating something like a parrot.

That's a difference to other languages and the way of thinking...

Can you imagine that e.g. Western European exchange students who go to
England or America have to learn at first how important are meaningless
polite phrases and that they have to tell "please", "may I help you?"
etc. as often as possible? Also, they have to learn that "how are you?"
is meaningless and nobody expects a real answer on it.
The most difficult issue for exchange students is that they have to keep
smiling and to wrap their meaning in many polite and positive words.
"Open" discussions, are to avoid... that's a big cultural difference.
e.g. "open" discussions with customers and pot. customers:
when there is an European request for something which makes no sense,
it's no problem to tell for what reason we don't sell it or would do the
requested custom engineering. It's no problem to discuss pros and cons
of better solutions.

If it's a NA customer, so I was taught that you have to make a "don't
want" price and you will get a problem if the customer even accepts that
price...

When you ask me, I prefer the 'unpolite' European way of bussiness and
our customers are happy to get solutions according the state of the art
;-)
Years ago, an American chairman of an international organization
explained me the difference of American and European business in the
following way:
You can order someting in America and you will get something very
fast, but you don't know if it meets your requirements. When you
order something in Europe, they tell you a delivery time of a few
days or more, but you can rely on it and you will get exactly what
you ordered.

It was amazing for me and hard to believe... but meanwhile we have
many years experience with NA soap bubbles in datas of products or
on homepages...
BTW, in the past I didn't understand why pot. customers from NA asked
if our offered products are _really_available_, it was a completely
absurd question for me...
you wrote:
"It means the answer is 'no' but the person responding doesn't
want you to think this is a dead end."

Believe me, that's the most annoying way of answer for non Americans
;-)

An other typial way of American comminication is "ignoring" something,
so it's quite normal for you when anyone says e.g. "It's hard to
ignore"... but ignoring can be seen as extremely unpolite on other
continents.

Just an example for American politeness which is annoying for me:
When returning from international fairs, we have a Carnet (customs
document) for the exhibition stuff. That document must be stamped
before leaving the country and it's always hard to find the customs
on an airport when you are departing.
Ask official persons from an US airport and the fun starts: most of
them are so polite that they never will tell you that they don't know.
So they give you a direction, assuming where it could be... and being
happy that they could 'help' you in a polite way... OK, with such great
and polite help it took us e.g. in Newark more than one hour to find
anyone competent who really knew where was the small back door to the
customs office from the departure level. (The arrival level can't be
passed in opposit direction!)

On non US airports the correct information how to reach customs office
from the departure level will take you at max.15 min., in Frankfurt
(FRA) less than 5 min.
We could go on with Asian politeness vs. Europe or NA etc., but I think
some NA/European examples will show you at least that it's always wrong
to interpret from the own standpoint as "the only right one".

In politics you will also find a lot of misunderstandings when one side
is ignoring the national way of life of the other one. Talk e.g with
guys from US and Iraque, you can talk about the same issue and what one
calls liberation is called occupation or liberation of oil from the
other one. Is only one of them right??

- Jutta
--
cburgess@qnx.com

Werner Schweizer

Re: Problems with nested interrupts at high interrupt load ?

Post by Werner Schweizer » Tue Aug 26, 2003 9:27 am

"Jutta Steinhoff" <j-steinhoff@web.de> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:3F4A010A.146F2EC6@web.de...
Kevin Stallard wrote:
[Armin] Rennie, the answer on my question was really annoying:
"Not that we will find anything wrong with your code, but it
---snip---
... but it will be a surprise for you that no one of your flowerful
conclusions hit the nail ;-) The very simple conclusion was: "why
doesn't he shut his mouth when he didn't saw a similar problem"; it's
nothing personal and has nothing to do with competence etc.
Well, this is amusing and very efficient too ;-).
Even in my limited english I try to follow up.

So, when there is no response, you know for sure, that there is no known
similar problem.
How long are you waiting.
And even more amusing:
imagine a guy from Bangladesh is responding YES.
What now.
Ist this guy competent or not.
I'm assuming you are asking for his code to be able to verify that.
If you are finding, that this guy doesn't have the same knowledge of QNX
than you have,
you can start to help him solve his problem.
Otherwise you are in the same situation as before.
You know, your problem exists on two places on the earth.
But you still know for sure, nowhere else :-).
And you didn't get any help this way either.

BTW. I'm european and I find this thread very interesting to learn some
english and culture.
But on the tecnical side I found interesting follow-ups only from people
trying to help you.
Werner Schweizer

---snip---

Post Reply

Return to “qdn.cafe”